Share My World – 2014 Week 12

Wow! Is the week over already?  I usually look forward to weekends but tomorrow I teach 2-day workshop and already I have 16 students and I can just see myself hobbling back home on Sunday, wishing there was a massage therapist handy to take care of me when I get there.  But anyway, before that workshop starts and sucks the life out of me, it’s time to share my world (so far!) with you, courtesy of Cee’s Photography.

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What is your most favorite smell/scent?

My most favorite scent would have to be a baby’s scent, like little puppies and kittens – and of course, little babies like my son, when he was literally just a little bundle in my arms.  His smell has certainly changed now that he’s four, but I still take a deep inhale of his hair whenever I can, even though that baby smell is long gone.

I do like the smell of certain colognes on a man.  But for now, I’ll stick to babies…

How do you write: computer, longhand or other?

I write much faster on the computer, but sometimes when I don’t have one close by, then by hand will have to do, especially when I have all these bright ideas for my novel.  Thankfully, I’ve started writing in journals again, and as long as I stick to the muse and my novel ideas, then I’m fine – the journal is safe from the next moment of anger that might strike me and I rip every page to shreds – like I did every single journal I kept in the last 20 years.  Sad, I know.

That’s why sometimes writing on the computer is much better.  I write so much that I don’t remember what file I’ve put what in…

Your favorite blog post that you have written? (add link)

You can’t ask me to name only one!  I can, however, name three:

In His Study – a short story about two of my novel characters long into the future of the story I’ve set them in.  It started out as a writing challenge, but I think it’s really not anymore – because it’s long….really long.

Lucas North on Line One – A daily prompt challenge about receiving a phone call from a stranger, and in this case, I chose to receive one from the muse I was writing about then, Lucas North.

Elevator – A writing prompt that places you stuck in an elevator with a stranger.  I wrote this with vintage small elevators in mind, an old unmarked can of Mace that used to be in my purse for years, and a tall, dark and handsome man with blue eyes – and hopefully no murderous tendencies…

What’s one of your favorite books from childhood?

The Little Prince, by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry.  It was one of the books that was already in my room when I was little, and I read that again and again, not exactly understanding why it was so sad, for a children’s book.  I recently just acquired my very own copy.  This was printed in 1943, and I am just so excited to read it again.  Hopefully I’ll understand the true meaning behind his words now, so many years after I last read it as a child.

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Bonus question:  What are you grateful for from last week, and what are you looking forward to in the week coming up?

I am grateful for spring.  At least now, the days are longer and I get to do more around the house, even though I wish I could do more but with each chore I do, that’s one hour taken away from my writing unfortunately.  It makes me realize just why it is there are more male poet laureates – they didn’t have to worry about dinner or the laundry or the PTA.

I am looking forward to teaching tomorrow’s Thai Yoga workshop, and in a way, getting it over with.  Teaching something to that many people can be stressful, and introducing them to an Asian bodywork technique that is so new, and so different from what they learned in Swedish massage can be a challenge.  For what I teach just about breaks almost all the fixed rules they learned, but it is what it is.

The Little Prince

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One of my favorite books growing up was Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s The Little Prince.

I don’t even remember how I got it, but I do know that it wasn’t something that I would have picked out on my own because we didn’t learn about such books at school.  It was among the books that my mother stored on shelves above my childhood bed that included a cover-less copy of Harold Robbins’ The Adventurers and the classics such as Black Beauty and Robinson Crusoe.  

I still remember how the book felt in my hands. It was small and it was a quick read, but I had to read it a few times because it did not read like all the other classics I had read before.  It was almost cryptic at times.

How was I to know, a mere ten year old, what the book was really about?  When the fox says to the little prince, “One sees clearly only with the heart. What is essential is invisible to the eye,” I understood it because it has since shaped the way I see the world.   But I could not understand then what the fox meant when he said, “You become responsible, forever, for what you have tamed” – that it meant more than just the taming of a small animal, of which I probably with my limited experiences, associated that sentence then.

It’s been a very long time since I’ve read The Little Prince and I’m due for a reread.  I stumbled across the dedication of the book today,  and it brought tears to my eyes.  It brought me back to that room with the custom-made bed and the shelves above it, all filled with books about adventures and worlds so different from my own.  And one of them, my favorite one, about a little prince stranded in the desert, so far from home.

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Image from Letters of Note

Leon Werth, a French writer and art critic, was a close friend and confidante to  Antoine de Saint-Exupéry.  He would not learn of the book nor the dedication till five months after Saint-Exupéry’s death in November 1944.